Harper's Ferry Pistols

US MP BRIGADE PATCHES



The corps colours of the US Army Military Police Corps are green and yellow. For this reason the vast majority of all US Army military police brigades make use of these colours as a basis.

US Army MP School US Army Military Police Center and School Fort McClellan, Alabama

The USAMPC&S was established in 1941, as the Provost Marshal General School located at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia. Later during 1941 a second school, the Military Police Service School was established at Fort Myer, Virginia. The following year, the MP Service School was renamed the Provost Marshal General School and in November 1942, the school moved to Fort Custer, Michigan. The PMG School moved again to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, in October 1944 and in March the following year the school moved to Camp Bullis, Texas. In 1948, there came some stability to the USAMPC when the school moved to Fort Gordon, Georgia.
It was renamed the US Army MP School and stayed there for over 25 years. In 1974, the school moved to Fort McClellan, Alabama, where it was renamed the US Army MP Center and School, although it is often known as "SWAMPY U".
During 1999 the School again moved from Ft McClellan, Alabama to Ft Leonard Wood in Missouri where it now forms part of the US Army Manouevre Centre ("MANCEN").

Using the green and gold of the MP Corps, the patch shape is identical to other combat support and combat service support schools. The crossed Harper's Ferry pistols are the traditional symbol of the military police, while the torch refers to education and learning.
8th MP Brigade 8th MP Brigade - Seoul, Korea

Constituted April 8, 1967 in the Regular Army as HHD, 8th MP Group.
Activated July 26, 1967 at Fort Riley, Kansas.
Inactivated on December 18, 1967 at Fort Riley, Kansas.
Activated August 24, 1968 in Vietnam.
Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 8th MP Group on January 22, 1970.
Inactivated on July 1, 1972 in Vietnam.
Activated, reorganized and redesignated HHC, 8th MP Brigade on April 11, 1996 at Seoul, Korea.

The sword represents the combat mission and together with the sun's rays are indicative of the symbol for the 8th MP Group. The red and blue taeguk is symbolic of the Republic of Korea, where the brigade was activated.
14th MP Brigade 14th MP Brigade (Inactive)

Constituted on June 24, 1965, as HHD, 14th MP Group.
Activated on June 25, 1965, in Germany.
Inactivated on June 20, 1972, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.
Redesignated as HHC, 14th MP Group on November 16, 1981, and activated in Germany. Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 14th MP Brigade on August 16, 1986.

Red is for courage and action. The four compass points symbolize both the four corners of the battlefield and the four combat missions. The fasces and the sword represent the magistrate's authority and the combat mission. The crossed weapons symbolize the Roman numeral "X" for 10 and the four compass points stand for "4," which allude to the numerical designation (14) of the unit.
15th MP Brigade 15th MP Brigade (Inactive)

The US Army's first MP Brigade was constituted on June 24, 1965, as HHD, 15th MP Brigade.
Activated on June 25, 1965 in Germany.
Inactivated on June 30, 1976 in Germany.

The griffin in the center is a mythological animal composed of the head and upper body of an eagle and the body of a lion, and is a symbol of eternal vigilance. The 15 projections on the battlement along the outside of the patch allude to the numerical designation (15) of the unit.
16th MP Brigade 16th MP Brigade - Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Constituted on March 23, 1966 as HHD, 16th MP Group.
Activated May 20, 1966, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.
Reorganized and redesignated HHC, 16th MP Brigade on July 16, 1981.

The star is symbolic of law enforcement, leadership and authority. The arrow represents military preparedness and protection. These symbols, along with the globe, indicate the overall mission, capabilities and operational sphere of the unit.
18th MP Brigade 18th MP Brigade - Mannheim, Germany

The US Army's first combat-tested MP Brigade was constituted on March 23, 1966, as HHD, 18th MP Brigade.
Activated on May 20, 1966, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.
Inactivated on March 29, 1973 at Oakland, California.
Redesignated as HHC, 18th MP Brigade on August 16, 1985, and activated in Germany.

In the background is the Roman fasces, a symbol of the magistrate's authority. Superimposed is a sword, connotating military power. Combined, they symbolize military law and order.
43rd MP Brigade 43rd MP Brigade (Rhode Island National Guard) - Warwick, Rhode Island

Converted from HHC, 43rd Engineer Group, Rhode Island Army National Guard, and redesignated as HHD, 43rd MP Brigade on May 1, 1968.
Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 43rd MP Brigade on May 1, 1976.

The fortification at the top alludes to the walls of the fifteenth century City of Rhodes, capital of the island of Rhodes, for which Rhode Island is named. The wavy bars symbolize the waters of Narragansett Bay. The pike is an early weapon used by guards, symbolizing protection.
49th MP Brigade 49th MP Brigade (Inactive)

Converted from HHC, 49th Infantry Brigade, California Army National Guard, and redesignated HHD, 49th MP Brigade on February 1, 1976 at Alemeda, California.
Reorganized and redesignated HHC, 49th MP Brigade on May 1 1976.
Inactivated in 1996.

The patch is the original patch of the 49th Infantry Brigade, which drew it's origins from the 49th Infantry Division. The number alludes to the gold prospectors, or "49ers" of California. The blue color is for the infantry. The gold diamond represents a gold nugget and it's discovery at Sutter's Mill, on the Amercian River, in 1849. The red design again alludes to Sutter's Mill and also the California sun.
89th MP Brigade 89th MP Brigade - Fort Hood, Texas

Constituted on February 19, 1966, as HHD, 89th MP Group.
Activated on March 15, 1966, in Vietnam.
Inactivated on December 21, 1971, at Fort Lewis, Washington.
Activated on September 13, 1972, at Fort Lewis, Washington.
Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 89th MP Brigade on July 16, 1981.

Red is symbolic of courage and the star is symbolic of law enforcement. The sword represents military justice, law, and order. The dragon represents authority and and guardianship and also alludes to the unit's original activation in the Republic of Vietnam. The eight points of the star and the nine stripes allude to the numerical designation (8-9) of the unit.
177th MP Brigade 177th MP Brigade - Taylor, Michigan

Converted from HHB, 157th Field Artillery, Michigan Army National Guard, and redesignated as HHC, 177th MP Group on April 1, 1976.
Reorganized and redesignated HHC, 177th MP Brigade on November 7, 1985.

The gear wheel represents both the "Motor City" of Detroit, Michigan (where the unit was originally organized) and alludes to a fortress, reflecting the unit's involvement in defense. The keys reflect the unit's mission of protection and law enforcement.
220th MP Brigade 220th MP Brigade - Gaithersburg, Maryland (National Guard)

Constituted on April 3, 1959, as HHD, 220th MP Group, US Army Reserve and assigned to Second US Army.
Activated May 25, 1959, at Washington, DC.
Changed location to Rockville, Maryland on July 23, 1960.
Reassigned January 1, 1966, to First US Army.
Changed location to Gathersburg, Maryland on April 17, 1970.
Reorganized and redesignated HHD, 220th MP Brigade on December 10, 1971.
Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 220th MP Brigade on April 16, 1980.

The pikes were weapons used by guards. The two sets of two pikes, plus the annulet surrounding them allude to the numerical designation (2-2-0) of the unit.
221st MP Brigade 221st MP Brigade (Inactive) - US Army Reserve

Constituted on April 2, 1959, as HHD, 221st MP Group, US Army Reserve and assigned to Sixth US Army.
Activated May 1, 1959, at San Jose, California.
Changed location to Sunnyvalle, California on June 1, 1961.
Changed location to San Jose, California on September 20, 1962.
Reorganized and redesignated HHD, 221st MP Brigade on December 10, 1971.
Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 220th MP Brigade on January 1, 1976.
Inactivated on September 15, 1996, at San Jose, California.

The griffin in the center is a mythological symbol of protection and vigilance, and has a legendary association to California. The sun, a symbol of truth and authority, represents jurisprudence and the wavy blue base symbolizes a coast, indicating the unit's location.
258th MP Brigade 258th MP Brigade (Inactive)

Converted from HHD, 258th Infantry Brigade, Arizona Army National Guard, and redesignated HHD, 258th MP Brigade in 1967 at Glendale, Arizona.
Inactivated in 1976, at Glendale, Arizona.

The patch is the original patch of the 158 Regimental Combat Team (Bushmasters). The colors are for the infantry, blue (new) and white (old). The bushmaster snake and machete represent the unit's service in World War II in the Panama Canal Zone.
260th MP Brigade 260th MP Brigade - Washington, D.C.

Converted from HHB, 260th Antiaircraft Artillery Group, District of Columbia Army National Guard, and redesignated as HHD, 260th MP Group on March 1, 1959.
Reorganized and redesignated HHC, 260th MP Brigade on May 1, 1985.

The sword and scales of justics symbolize the duality of armed security duties and law enforcement duties. The three red stars and two red bars on the white background are taken from the District of Columbia flag, indicating the unit's location. The District flag, itself, is based on General George Washington's family coat of arms.
290th MP Brigade 290th MP Brigade (Inactive) - Nashville, Tennessee

Constituted in the US Army Reserve on November 1, 1971, as HHC, 290th MP Brigade, activated at Nashville, Tennessee and assigned to the Third US Army.
Reassigned October 1, 1973, to the First US Army.
Reassigned to the Second US Army on October 1, 1983. Inactivated on October 15, 1985, at Nashville, Tennessee.

The partizans were medieval weapons. They are crossed to indicate control of exit and entry. The circular embattled area is symbolic of the prisoner of war camps and military security facilities commanded and operated by the brigade. The two partizans, nine sides of the nonagon and circular center allude to the numerical designation (2-9-0) of the unit.
300th POW Command 300th POW Command - Inkster, Michigan

Constituted on April 16, 1959, as HHC, 300th MP Prisoner of War Command, US Army Reserve and assigned to Fifth US Army.
Activated May 1, 1959, at Royal Oak, Michigan.
Changed location to Dearborn, Michigan on July 1, 1959.
Changed location to Livonia, Michigan on April 7, 1966.
Changed location to Inkster, Michigan on November 30, 1980.
Reorganized and redesignated HHC, 300th MP Command on June 16, 1982.
Reassigned October 1, 1984, to the Fourth US Army.

The key is symbolic of command and control. The double bits refer to the evacuation and process of prisoners of war and civilian internees. The three prongs of the bits and three foils indicate command, administration, and logistical assistance. The open foils simulate the letter "C," the Roman numeral "100". The three foils, therefore, allude to the numerical designation (300) of the unit.
800th MP Brigade (EPW) - Uniondale, New York

Constituted as the 800th MP Battalion on May 31, 1942.
Activated on June 4, 1942, at Fort Ord, California.
Inactivated on May 31, 1947, in Japan.
Redesignated as the 333rd MP Battalion on January 25, 1949, and allotted to the US Army Reserve.
Assigned to First US Army on February 15, 1949.
Activated February 25, 1959, at Buffalo, New York.
Changed location to New York, New York, on January 19, 1950.
Inactivated on August 15, 1952, at New York, New York.
Redesignated as the 800th MP Battalion on June 24, 1953.
Headquarters, 800th MP Battalion redesignated as HHD, 800th MP Group on April 22, 1959.
Activated on May 1, 1959, at Hempstead, New York.
Changed location to Garden City, New York, on June 15, 1959.
Changed location to Hempstead, New York, on January 31, 1966.
Ordered to active duty on March 24, 1970 and released on March 26, 1970.
Reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 800th MP Brigade on October 16, 1984.

The axe-head shape of the patch indicates authority and security. The oak leave is symbolic of the oak trees at Fort Ord, California, where the unit was activated. The sword symbolizes military strength.



Brigade patch graphics and unit histories taken with thanks from Mike Rovedo's now defunct site on the US Army Military Police Corps.